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Monday, March 20, 2017

Podcast Episode 60: Documentaries, with Joe Martin


This episode we talk to Joe Martin about something a bit different - documentaries. Although Joe's latest film (Us and Them) is fiction he has previously created many documentaries, including the doc feature "Keep Quiet" about far right politician Csanád Szeged.

Us and Them was at SXSW recently. Here's a review.

So he is ideally placed to talk about drama-docs and the increase use of story consultants within the doc world. Is it a good development that adds clarity or a bad trend that creates formulaic content.

His IMBD = http://www.imdb.com/name/nm5630563/

Thursday, March 02, 2017

3 act, 9 act? Consider the sequence approach



Sometimes, as writers, we can get a bit obsessed about different structures. But the sequence approach is slightly different. Not all writers know about it however, hence this post. I'm a big fan.

It is different because it comes at the issue of structure from another point of view. It simply states that a story is made up of sequences that are 10-15 minute in length - and that those sequences are like mini pieces of drama in themselves, perhaps with a mini 3-act inside them. So one film may have 8 sequences, while another longer film could have 12.

The sequence approach can be a useful style of structure, especially for ‘road movie’ style narratives or character pieces. But actually you see it a lot in action movies too or thrillers - where each sequence features a different method to overcome the villain for example.

If you focus on ensuring that the sequence you are writing is exciting and fulfilling - and that each sequence is emotionally different to the one before and after it - you can really engage the audience. You can keep them along for the ever-changing emotional journey.

It can also be a useful tool for those with a lot of experience writing shorts or TV episodes who are daunted by a feature. Shorts are usually single sequences. So this approach allows you to see that writing a feature made of 7 sequences is no more scary than writing 7 short scripts.

Some good examples of this structure, for me, are films such as:
“Falling Down” - each stop on Michael Douglas' journey is a sequence
“Fandango” - the stages of our heroes' 1960s road trip

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Light leak wipe - in cool hues - 4K - free download

Here is my latest 4K light leak - or actually a set of 6 in one download!! As ever, available for free (and also you can watch it it in 2160p / UHD on YouTube) via Creative Commons, details below.

I collect all my light leaks on a special page where there are MORE FREE DOWNLOADS, so bookmark it. So far, they have been downloaded well over 400,000 times! And used in TV shows on NatGeo, Discovery and BBC1. As well as in many trailers and indie films.

This new one has a set of six different light leak wipes, all with a cool colour or cyan hue. This makes them great for hi tech or sciencey vibes!

All six are slightly different in style, but max out at pure white allowing for a transition or cut to occur underneath. I include all 6 in one download so that you can use them at different points in your edit without repeating the exact same effect over and over.






If, in your edit package, you then alter the speed of the clips or reverse them you can create even more different looks.

Download here (149MB) - http://www.mediafire.com/file/syoxizc1z3wtm7d/4K-Light_Streak_Wipe_Cool.mp4

If you are using these clips for a commercial project with a budget then get in touch. I make the leaks free for non-commercial use (short films etc). Creative Commons details on the main page.

If HD leaks are of interest to you (under the same conditions) then I have loads here.

If you want to do me a favour because of all this cool stuff - that would be great too. Cheers. A few suggestions...


If you are super kind and get something out of using these then please donate a small amount via the button below...

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Podcast Episode 59: Pete & Nat - Treehouse Digital.



This episode of podcast myself and Danny rock up to interview Peter Stanley-Ward and Natalie Conway from Treehouse Digital. We've known them for ages. I've known them for even longer than that. As Pete mentions, we first met when he came along to an evening class I was running at the local college. Going to writing classes, or starting your own class or group (one was started at Treehouse Digital this week!) is always a good idea. Just to meet other people you find a shared vision with.

Pete and Nat are unusual in that they are a couple of writers who are also an actual couple! They made their way into the creative industries via a low budget horror feature called Small Town Folk which they used both a self-funded training course AND a calling card.

Fast forward a few years and they launched a production company which does paid gigs as well as making fantastic shorts like Litterbugs. We like them as they do kids entertainment too, so we get to have a good industry gossip with them and share tips and leads. And then lent us their room for an audition for our next top secret project ;)

How did they do it? Who helped? What lessons have they learned? We asked them!

Is it better to make a feature and learn that way than go to Uni? And we compare our self / crowd funded movie with their one funded via Creative England - which way is better?

Fun fact: Pete filmed some of our behind the scenes footage on Who Killed Nelson Nutmeg?



LINKS FEATURED:
Treehouse Digital: http://www.treehousedigital.com
Litterbugs (their short): http://www.litterbugsthemovie.com